Paul Greenberg & FRONTLINE search for fish that’s good for you and the planet

Written by on April 24, 2017 in Editor's Choice, Other News
Bestselling author and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg. Photo Credit: FRONTLINE

Bestselling author and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg. Photo Credit: FRONTLINE

“What fish should I eat that’s good for me and good for the planet?”

That’s a question many of us have probably asked before. Now, it’s being asked by bestselling author and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg in a new 90-minute FRONTLINE special: The Fish on My Plate.

Greenberg travels to Peru to learn more about one of the largest wild fisheries in the world and stops in Alaska to discuss the long history of salmon fishing. He visits Norway where modern fish farming was invented and heads to his home state of Connecticut to visit an entirely different kind of ocean farming operation.

During this whole journey, Greenberg’s only source of animal protein came from fish. He spends a whole year eating seafood for breakfast, lunch, and dinner to find out what kind of impact seafood and omega-3s have on his health, ranging from blood pressure and cholesterol to mental health and sleep patterns.

The Fish on My Plate airs tomorrow, April 25, 2017 – be sure to tune in to learn more about the relationship between ocean health and human health! Watch the trailer to get excited:

To learn more:

In “The Fish on My Plate,” bestselling author and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg sets out to answer the question “what fish should I eat that’s good for me and good for the planet?” As part of his quest to investigate the health of the ocean — and his own — Greenberg spends a year eating seafood at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Pictured above is Paul Greenberg looking out at an anchoveta fleet in Peru. Photo Credit: FRONTLINE

In “The Fish on My Plate,” bestselling author and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg sets out to answer the question “what fish should I eat that’s good for me and good for the planet?” As part of his quest to investigate the health of the ocean — and his own — Greenberg spends a year eating seafood at breakfast, lunch and dinner. Pictured above is Paul Greenberg looking out at an anchoveta fleet in Peru. Photo Credit: FRONTLINE

Copyright © 2017 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

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