Getting Students Involved in Ocean Acidification Research

Written by on September 9, 2013 in Other News

As carbon dioxide emissions grow, the pH in the some parts of the ocean decreases, leading to ocean acidification. This process is particularly damaging to hard-shelled organisms as increasing acidity makes it harder for them to build and maintain those hard, calcified parts. But the effects of ocean acidification go far beyond shellfish. Check out some of these posts to learn more:

So what are we doing about this ocean acidification problem?

A Seabird CTD (conductivity, temperature, and depth) profiler which is used to measure salinity and temperature in the tide pools. Photo courtesy of Emily Gottlieb.

A Seabird CTD profiler which is used to measure salinity and temperature in the tide pools. Photo courtesy of Emily Gottlieb.

Emily Gottlieb, a recent graduate of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is working on a new project that will get high school students directly involved in ocean acidification research.

In collaboration with Dr. Andreas Andersson, Emily is putting together lab kits that will allow classes to collect water samples, record chemical parameters relevant to ocean acidification and analyze their data. Getting students involved in ocean acidification research will help researchers better understand the impact that it is having on the southern California coast.

Her project recently went live on the crowdfunding site Microryza. The funds she raises will pay for the materials and distribution of the ocean acidification lab kits and will cover transportation costs for getting classes to and from workshops and the water! Check it out: Ocean Acidification Lab Kits: Student Scientists Saving the World.

Students Shaun Stringer and Charlie Davidson collecting and analyzing samples in the local La Jolla tide pools, where the high school students will go to collect their samples with the lab kits. Photo courtesy of Emily Gottlieb.

Students Shaun Stringer and Charlie Davidson collecting and analyzing samples in the local La Jolla tide pools, where the high school students will go to collect their samples with the lab kits. Photo courtesy of Emily Gottlieb.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

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