Watch Live As Scientists Explore the Deep Sea

Written by on August 14, 2013 in Marine Life

UPDATE — The expedition is over but you can still get all the details here from daily updates written during the mission or by checking out the photo and video log.

A baby octopus (Graneledone verrucosa)  moves across the seafloor as ROV Deep Discoverer explores Veatch Canyon. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.

A baby octopus (Graneledone verrucosa) moves across the seafloor as ROV Deep Discoverer explores Veatch Canyon. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.

The deep sea is still very mysterious to us, but scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are working to change that.

At shore and on board NOAA’s ship Okeanos Explorer, researchers are exploring the deep sea with help of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) called Deep Discoverer. The Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition began last month and will conclude on August 17. The best part about this expedition is that it’s being broadcast live (usually from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.) for anybody to watch!

There are three different live streams with views of the habitat and marine life in the deep sea. In each live stream you can hear the scientists and technicians discuss what they are seeing

Here’s the view from stream 1 — be sure to check out the others before the expedition ends!

To learn more:

NOAA's new deepwater remotely operated vehicle, Deep Discoverer (D2), is deployed off the fantail of the ship for the first dive of the expedition. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.

NOAA’s new deepwater remotely operated vehicle, Deep Discoverer (D2), is deployed off the fantail of the ship for the first dive of the expedition. Image courtesy of NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program, 2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. She is also a PADI diver and dog lover. .

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect with MST on Google Plus

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Top