Protecting the World’s Rarest Marine Mammal

Written by on June 10, 2013 in Marine Life, Whales & Dolphins

Daily Summary

Blackfish: watch a clip from a new documentary about killer whales in captivity

Blackfish is a documentary about marine mammals in captivity that highlights the life of Tilikum, a killer whale responsible for the death of several people. A new clip from the film was recently released–watch it to learn more.

Mexico approves measure to save world’s rarest marine mammal

Reef in the Gulf of California.

Reef in the Gulf of California. Photo credit:Colorado_Al via photopin cc.

The vaquita is the smallest cetacean, reaching a maximum length of 1.5 meters and is endemic to Mexico where it only lives in the upper Gulf of California. It also faces the highest risk of extinction of all cetaceans in the world; it is estimated that there are less than 20 individuals alive today. In an effort to save this animal, the government of Mexico recently approved new regulations that promote sustainable fishing practices. Drift gillnets, the biggest threat to vaquitas, will be gradually substituted with selective fishing gear that won’t harm the endangered animal while allowing fishermen to continue to earn a living.

Rutgers Findings May Predict the Future of Coral Reefs in a Changing World

For the first time, scientists have described the biological process of how corals create their skeletons and become limestone. They found that the reaction occurs regardless of water acidity which could be good news for corals as ocean acidification continues.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

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