Fish Farms, Wave Farms and a Rescued Orca

Written by on May 23, 2013 in Marine Life

Daily Summary

The farmed halibut that’s better to eat than its wild brothers

Atlantic halibut.

Atlantic halibut. Photo credit: NOAA.

Check out this great article about a fish farm that is environmentally friendly and produces some tasty fish. The “huge network of tanks” in Scotland was originally built for salmon but is now home to about 6,000 halibut that remain in the tanks until they are at marketable size. At the halibut farm, a wind turbine provides the power for to run the machinery and the fish feed comes from a certified sustainable fishery. Plus, the fish are maintained in low densities so they don’t get sick the way other farmed fish do.

Ministers approve plans for world’s biggest wave farm in Western Isles

Ministers in the UK have approved plans for the world’s largest commercial wave farm — a 40MW farm that will be located off the north-west coast of Lewis that is strong enough to power about 30,000 homes. The devices will be installed once the offshore grid is put in place which won’t likely be until 2017.

Northland fishermen help to rescue orca

A male orca stranded in New Zealand this week and a group of fishermen is being praised for keeping the orca calm and wet until rescuers arrived. Earlier that day, the fishermen had seen at least eight other orcas in the local harbor feeding on stingrays. At some point, Koru became stranded and was able to swim free later in the day when the tide came in.

Orcas.

Orcas. Photo credit: Dave Ellifrit, NOAA.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. She is also a PADI diver and dog lover. .

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