Improving Offshore and Coastal Management in the EU

Written by on March 14, 2013 in Policy & Ocean Law
The Lillgrund offshore wind farm in Sweden. The Directive on Maritime Spatial Planning and Integrated Coastal   Management will help manage all human activity offshore, including aquaculture, wind farms and more.

The Lillgrund offshore wind farm in Sweden. The Directive on Maritime Spatial Planning and Integrated Coastal Management will help manage all human activity offshore, including aquaculture, wind farms and more. Photo credit: Tomasz Sienicki.

Yesterday, the European Commission launched a new proposal designed to improve the planning of maritime activities at sea, such as offshore wind energy, shipping, fishing and other human and economic activities.

“This initiative will contribute to a healthy environment and better living conditions for the 200 million EU citizens who live in coastal regions,” said European Commissioner for the Environment Janez Potočnik. “It should also help preserve unique and diverse coastlines and ecosystems that offer invaluable habitats for plants and animals”

The proposal aims to create a “common European framework for maritime spatial planning and integrated coastal management” in order to ensure that maritime and coastal activities, including the use of marine resources, remain sustainable throughout the European Union.

The Commission states that increasing human activity offshore and along the coast could lead to problems – like competition for space and resources – if not managed properly. This proposal will attempt to better monitor these activities by requiring Member States to map all plans. Using a common map, the Commission will be able to use space and resources more efficiently and develop better coastal management strategies.

To learn more:

View from inside a Hawaii offshore aquaculture cage. The Directive will help manage all human activity offshore, including aquaculture, wind farms and more.

View from inside a Hawaii offshore aquaculture cage. The Directive will help manage all human activity offshore, including aquaculture, wind farms and more. Photo credit: NOAA.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

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