Frozen Methane, Military Dolphins and Sea Level Rise

Written by on March 13, 2013 in Marine Life

Daily Summary

Digital map of sea level rise in South Florida. Image credit: NOAA.

Digital map of sea level rise in South Florida. Image credit: NOAA.

Deep trouble: How sea-rise could cause havoc in South Florida

In this interactive map of South Florida, you can see just how serious a threat sea level rise really is. The map was created by five experts to help illustrate the severity of sea level rise, and to help inspire action. The accompanying article discusses how three major sewage treatment plants will be “reduced to shrinking islands” over the next few decades, and that’s only the beginning of the trouble.

Japan becomes first nation to extract ‘frozen gas’ from seabed

Yesterday, Japan successfully extracted natural gas from frozen methane hydrate deposits in the Pacific Ocean. Methane hydrate is a form of methane gas found frozen below the sea or in permanently frozen ground. It is expensive to extract methane hydrate, but Japan hopes to continue this path in order to produce their own energy from their own reserves. If successful, methane hydrate could provide Japan with natural gas for up to 100 years. According to CleanBiz.Asia, India is close behind.

Methane gas hydrate forming below a rock. Photo credit: NOAA.

Methane gas hydrate forming below a rock. Photo credit: NOAA.

Update: Ukrainian Military Dolphins Not Actually on the Loose

If you were worried about running into dolphins armed with pistols and knives in the Black Sea, you can relax. Yesterday’s breaking news about dolphins that escaped from the Ukrainian military’s training facility was a hoax. Unfortunately, the fact remains that dolphins are still used for military purposes–not only in the Ukrainian military, but in the United States and other places as well.

A bottlenose dolphin, part of the United States Navy Marine Mammal Program, wearing a pinger. Photo credit: U.S. Navy.

A bottlenose dolphin, part of the United States Navy Marine Mammal Program, wearing a pinger. Photo credit: U.S. Navy.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

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