Find Out What Fish You’re Swimming With

Written by on February 27, 2013 in Fish, Marine Life
The Redfish (Centroberyx affinis) - an illustration from FishMap.

The Redfish (Centroberyx affinis) – an illustration from FishMap.

Do you ever wonder what fish are swimming around your feet when you’re at the beach? Have you ever thought about the fish that swim just below your boat? Or the fish that swim hundreds or even thousands of feet beneath that boat?

Well, now you can answer those questions…provided that you live in Australia.

The Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)’s Wealth from Oceans Flagship and the Atlas of Living Australia have partnered to create FishMap, an online resource that gives you the opportunity to discover what fish live in any location at any depth along Australia’s continental shelf and slope.

“FishMap is the only resource of its kind in the world that covers virtually all species of marine fish found in the marine waters of an entire continent,” explained CSIRO ichthyologist Daniel Gledhill.

FishMap can be used for any number of projects, from helping you figure out what fish you saw on your last dive, to determining what fish you might catch for dinner. It also has the potential to improve the quality of data collected by citizen scientists. It lists more than 4,500 marine fishes and includes illustrations for over 95% of those species.

FishMap was officially launched yesterday (Feb 26) and can be found on the Atlas of Living Australia website.

To learn more:

The Clown Triggerfish (Balistoides conspicillum) - an illustration from FishMap.

The Clown Triggerfish (Balistoides conspicillum) – an illustration from FishMap.

Copyright © 2013 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed Find MST on Instagram Connect with MST on Google Plus

Comments are closed.

Top