Japanese Fisheries Agency to Expand Sale of Meat from ‘Scientific Whaling’

Written by on November 20, 2012 in Marine Life

Emily Tripp

Whale meat at the Tsukiji fish market in Japan.

Whale meat at the Tsukiji fish market in Japan. Photo credit: Stefan Powell.

The Japanese Fisheries Agency recently announced that it will begin selling whale meat from whales caught for “scientific research” directly to restaurants and individuals in 2013.

This plan was enacted in order to make up for the loss of profit from the scientific whaling industry.  The Japanese scientific whaling program costs 4.5-5 billion yen annually (about US$60 million).  They have been selling less and less to meat traders because the general consumption of whale meat by Japanese people has been decreasing.

Beginning next year, the JFA will:

  • sell more whale meat to the public via mail order
  • sell whale meat directly to restaurants
  • provide more whale meat for school lunches at a lower cost

According to several reports, this isn’t the first time the government has had to look for money elsewhere to pay for the whaling program.  In 2011, the government used 2.28 billion yen (about US$28 million) from the March 2011 tsunami/earthquake recovery fund, in addition to its $6 million annual subsidy, to pay for the hunt.

To learn more:

A Minke whale and her 1-year-old calf are dragged aboard the Nisshin Maru, the only whaling factory ship.

A Minke whale and her 1-year-old calf are dragged aboard the Nisshin Maru, the only whaling factory ship. Photo credit: Australian Customs and Border Protection Service.

Copyright © 2012 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed Find MST on Instagram Connect with MST on Google Plus

Comments are closed.

Top