New Tracking Method To Help Save Loggerhead Turtles

Written by on September 23, 2012 in Marine Life, Technology

Researchers from the University of Central Florida are using a new technique to track loggerhead turtles.

Their method, which is just as effective as satellite tracking, involves linking chemical signatures of the turtles’ diets and water to their migratory routes.

A young loggerhead sea turtle swiming near Panama City, FL.Photo credit: NOAA.

A young loggerhead sea turtle swiming near Panama City, FL.Photo credit: NOAA.

The Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge is a 13 mile beach, home to the second largest population of loggerheads in the world, but the number of loggerhead nests has been steadily declining since 2000.

Loggerheads spend 99 percent of their time in the water and return to beaches only to nest once every two or three years, which is why it is particularly important to protect their nesting grounds.

The new technique could help conservationists and managers better protect nesting grounds, migration routes and foraging grounds.

“By combining isotope research with satellite tracking technology, we are learning exciting information about loggerhead sea turtles,” said Daniel R. Evans, a research specialist at the Sea Turtle Conservancy and co-author of the research paper.  “This research helps scientists and conservation managers identify key feeding areas for loggerhead turtles and helps direct policy and regulations that protect sea turtles in these specific areas.”

A loggerhead (Caretta caretta) swimming in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Photo credit: NOAA.

A loggerhead (Caretta caretta) swimming in Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. Photo credit: NOAA.

Copyright © 2012 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

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  1. Stephanie says:

    I love LoggerHead Turtles and I think that it’s a good idea to save them, just like people risk their lives to save you in the Navy, Air Force, and all those kind of things, but most importantly an animal should be respect just like people have respect for you and God made the animal and you, so I think you should respect it.

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