Annual Dolphin Slaughter in the Cove to Begin Tomorrow

Written by on August 31, 2012 in Marine Life, Other News, Policy & Ocean Law

The annual dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan will begin tomorrow, September 1.  Ric O’Barry and his team from Save Japan Dolphins and Dolphin Project will report live from the Cove beginning tonight, Friday August 31.

Many others will join the team near the Cove of Taiji to protest and hold signs warning the locals that dolphin meat contains high levels of mercury.  Additionally, other supporters from 90 cities around the globe will host Japan Dolphins Day as a way to raise awareness.

“We have made some progress” said O’Barry.  “The number of dolphins being killed in Taiji have gone down for the past four years of our Save Japan Dolphins Campaign.”  Regardless, the fishermen of Taiji still receive permits to kill over 2,000 dolphins every year, according to Earth Island‘s International Marine Mammal Project.

You can watch the live broadcast from Japan on O’Barry’s Ustream channel beginning at 10:30pm EST tonight and continuing at 11:00pm EST tomorrow, September 1.

You can read more about the dolphin slaughter and Japan Dolphins Day here: Japan Dolphins Day 2012 unites the world for one cause.

“A dolphin's smile is the greatest deception. It creates the illusion that they're always happy.” -Ric O'Barry. Photo credit: Dolphin Project

“A dolphin’s smile is the greatest deception. It creates the illusion that they’re always happy.” -Ric O’Barry. Photo credit: Dolphin Project

Ric O'Barry with dolphin meat. Photo credit: Dolphin Project.

Ric O’Barry with dolphin meat. Photo credit: Dolphin Project.

Bloody waters of the Cove during the slaughter. Photo credit: Dolphin Project.

Bloody waters of the Cove during the slaughter. Photo credit: Dolphin Project.

Copyright © 2012 by Marine Science Today, a publication of Marine Science Today LLC.

About the Author

About the Author: Emily Tripp is the Publisher and Editor of MarineScienceToday.com. She holds marine science and biology degrees from the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science and a Master of Advanced Studies degree in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. When she's not writing about marine science, she's probably running around outside or playing with her dog. .

Subscribe

If you enjoyed this article, subscribe now to receive more just like it.

Subscribe via RSS Feed Find MST on Instagram Connect with MST on Google Plus

Comments are closed.

Top