Archive for June, 2011

The Value of a Shark

Written by on June 30, 2011 in Marine Life
The Value of a Shark

Emily Tripp Senior Writer Shark populations have experienced a dramatic decrease in the last 50 years, primarily as a result of human disturbances.  A recent article in Current Issues in Tourism by Austin J. Gallagher and Dr. Neil Hammerschlag of the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program at the University of Miami explains the impact of […]

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Deep-Water Giant Squid Found off Coast of Florida

Written by on June 29, 2011 in Marine Life

A rare deep-water giant squid was brought to the University of Florida in Gainesville on Monday.   The squid, 25 feet long, was recovered by recreational fishermen who found it floating on the surface about 12 miles from Jensen Beach. “It’s so rare to get these specimens and they’re such deep-water animals that we don’t […]

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New Zealand Right Whale Fights Back Against Extinction

Written by on June 29, 2011 in Marine Life
New Zealand Right Whale Fights Back Against Extinction

Emily Tripp Senior Writer A new study published on June 27 in Marine Ecology Progress Series shows that, for the first time, a small population of southern right whales is finding  its way back to the ancestral calving grounds of mainland New Zealand. More than a century ago, these whales were hunted to local extinction–so thoroughly that they […]

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Entire Sub-Population of Marine Turtles Tracked by Satellite

Written by on June 28, 2011 in Marine Life
Entire Sub-Population of Marine Turtles Tracked by Satellite

Emily Tripp Senior Writer For the first time, a University of Exeter team has successfully monitored the movements of an entire sub-population of marine turtles.  Their success confirms that these turtles can be closely monitored through satellite tracking, which can help predict migrations and implement conservation measures. Dr. Lucy Hawkes, lead author and University of […]

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Are Sevengill Sharks Making a Comeback?

Written by on June 21, 2011 in Marine Life, Other News
Are Sevengill Sharks Making a Comeback?

Editor’s Note– Michael Bear is the Science Diving columnist for California Diver Magazine. He is also an AAUS (American Academy of Underwater Sciences) Science Diver with 1000 cold-water dives in California. While not a professional shark researcher, Bear is in the beginning stages of a baseline population study of Sevengill sharks and he runs the […]

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Jellyfish Blooms Alter Energy Pathways

Written by on June 9, 2011 in Jellyfish, Marine Life
Jellyfish Blooms Alter Energy Pathways

A new study by the researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) revealed that jellyfish have a more significant impact than just irritating swimmers in the Chesapeake: they are drastically changing the marine food webs by shifting food energy away from fish towards bacteria. The frequency and size of jellyfish blooms in coastal and […]

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Dead Whale Found on a Long Island, NY Beach

Written by on June 8, 2011 in Marine Life
Dead Whale Found on a Long Island, NY Beach

A 30-40 foot finback whale was found dead on a New York beach early this Wednesday morning.  The whale washed up on Atlantic Beach on the south shore of Long Island about 30 miles from Manhattan.  A large portion of the whale was said to be injured or decomposed. The whale was first spotted near Long Branch, New […]

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National Ocean Month

Written by on June 6, 2011 in Policy & Ocean Law

The Obama Administration announced that June is National Ocean Month! The National Ocean Council is conducting a set of public listening sessions and NOAA is sponsoring four of these sessions.  For more information, read the full story by NOAA. Copyright ©  2011 by Marine Science Today, a publication of OceanLines LLC

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Frequent Fraud in Seafood Labeling

Written by on June 5, 2011 in Policy & Ocean Law
Frequent Fraud in Seafood Labeling

Emily Tripp Senior Writer Scientists have begun to uncover extensive seafood labeling fraud in supermarkets and restaurants.  The use of gene sequencers proved that in many cases cheap fish is being substituted for expensive species, and overfished species are being sold as species that are still abundant. Some of the most common label “mix-ups” include: Yellowtail for mahi-mahi […]

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Did Bacteria Really Consume the Methane Released from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill?

Written by on June 4, 2011 in Marine Life, Physical Oceanography
Did Bacteria Really Consume the Methane Released from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill?

Scientists are arguing against a widely publicized study which concluded that bacteria consumed the methane released from the Deepwater Horizon well in the Gulf of Mexico.  This argument was sparked by a comment published in the May 27 issue of the journal Science. Samantha Joye, marine scientists, lead author, University of Georgia Athletic Association Professor in Arts […]

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