Archive for May, 2011

Fun Fact About Manatees

Written by on May 31, 2011 in Marine Life
Fun Fact About Manatees

Emily Tripp Senior Writer All mammals–humans and giraffes, mice and dolphins–have the same number of vertebrae.  Manatees (and sloths, but they don’t matter in Marine Science Today) are a unique exception to this rule.  New research published in BioMed Central’s open access journal EvoDevo shows how different species have evolved their unique necks. Reptiles, amphibians […]

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Effects of Climate Change on Marine Mammal Biodiversity

Written by on May 29, 2011 in Marine Life
Effects of Climate Change on Marine Mammal Biodiversity

Emily Tripp Senior Writer A study that appeared recently in PLoS ONE, published by marine biologist Dr. Kristin Kaschner, shows that about half the species of marine mammals will experience a loss in their habitat and the ranges of the other half may increase by up to 40 percent due to climate change.  Kaschner is a […]

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NOAA to Determine Protection of Tuna TODAY at 2:00pm

Written by on May 27, 2011 in Policy & Ocean Law

NOAA will host a constituent briefing on it’s announcement that  Atlantic Bluefin Tuna do not warrant species protection under the Endangered Species Act this afternoon at 2:00.  When more information is available about the effects of the Deepwater Horizon BP oil spill and the new stock assessment from the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tuna […]

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Stricter Regulations on Shark Finning

Written by on May 26, 2011 in Policy & Ocean Law
Stricter Regulations on Shark Finning

Emily Tripp Senior Writer Shark fin soup, what was once a delicacy in China, is now becoming increasingly popular among the middle class and other Asian nations.  While it is still the most popular in China, it is also spreading to the West; European demand has grown significantly in the past few decades. Unfortunately, the […]

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Octopuses are Flexible and Fast Learners

Written by on May 23, 2011 in Marine Life
Octopuses are Flexible and Fast Learners

Scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have revealed that, in addition to being smart, octopuses have some pretty unique moves. Octopuses have large well-developed brains which makes them fast learners and because they are not limited by a hard skeleton, they are  flexible; however, for this same reason, it was believed that they had limited […]

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Japanese Seafood Industry Still Suffering Effects of Tsunami

Written by on May 22, 2011 in Marine Life, Physical Oceanography
Japanese Seafood Industry Still Suffering Effects of Tsunami

The earthquake and corresponding tsunami in Japan on March 11 have severely damaged the Japanese seafood industry, in addition to the already devastating human toll. Previously, Japan was considered to have one of the most vibrant seafood markets in the world.  The recent disaster has damaged all parts of the industry, from processing to importing. […]

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Beaked Whale Foraging Habitats Located in the Bahamas

Written by on May 7, 2011 in Marine Life
Beaked Whale Foraging Habitats Located in the Bahamas

A recent study, published in PLoS ONE, explains a new way to identify beaked whale foraging habitats.  The study was led by Dr. Elliott Hazen and colleagues from Duke University, Woods Hole, and the Naval Undersea Warfare Center. They listened for foraging beaked whales and measured ocean features and distributions of prey off the east coast of Andross […]

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From the Eyes of a Box Jellyfish

Written by on May 2, 2011 in Jellyfish, Marine Life
From the Eyes of a Box Jellyfish

By Emily Tripp Senior Writer While jellyfish seem like the simplest creatures, box jellies actually have a very complex visual system.  They have 24 eyes of four different kinds.  A new study recently published in Current Biology, has evidence that four of those eyes are always looking up out of the water.  It is these […]

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