Turning the North Pacific Gyre Plastic into Useful Materials

Written by on November 2, 2009 in Marine Life, Other News, Technology
Plastic confetti alongside baby blue velellas in the North Pacific Gyre - Credit: Karin Malmstrom/Marine Photobank

Plastic confetti alongside baby blue velellas in the North Pacific Gyre - Credit: Karin Malmstrom/Marine Photobank

Mary Crowley, co-funder of Project Kasei and one of the members of the team that studies the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and sailed along the SEAPLEX expedition – see our report about the expedition – last August, is dreaming of converting the little pieces of plastic, that are being ingested by marine life, into fuel or building materials while cleaning the ocean.

Read the original full story at CNN’s Woman tackles “Great Garbage Patch.

This is a photo of lanternfish (Mytophids) and microplastic debris collected at the surface in the North Pacific gyre - Credit: James Leichter/Marine Photobank

This is a photo of lanternfish (Mytophids) and microplastic debris collected at the surface in the North Pacific gyre - Credit: James Leichter/Marine Photobank

Copyright ©  2009 by Marine Science Today, a publication of OceanLines LLC

About the Author

About the Author: Celia is Director of Business Operations for OceanLines LLC and is a frequent contributor to both OceanLines and Marine Science Today. She is a certified diver and her favorite topic is marine biology, especially stories about whales. .

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