Scotland’s Only ‘Protected’ Dolphin Population Threatened by Military Exercise

Written by on October 13, 2009 in Marine Life, Policy & Ocean Law
An adult female bottlenose dolphin with her young, Moray Firth, Scotland  -  Photographer: Peter Asprey  -  http://www.peter-asprey.com/

An adult female bottlenose dolphin with her young, Moray Firth, Scotland – Photographer: Peter Asprey – http://www.peter-asprey.com/

The BBC UK posted an article today about conservationists claiming that the moving of Europe’s biggest military exercise to the outer Moray Firth poses a threat to bottlenose dolphins.

Joint Warrior, Europe’s largest military exercise, that includes up to 20 warships, 4 submarines and 40 aircraft from 9 countries, is taking place over two weeks that began on October 5, 2009.

The Whale and Dolphin Conservation Society reacted strongly to the news of the exercise expansion as it considers it a direct threat to the North Sea’s vulnerable 130 bottlenose dolphins and other marine wildlife found in the region at this time of year.

Mother and calf

Mother and calf

Bottlenose dolphins are not endangered.  Their future is stable because of their abundance and high adaptability.  However, some specific populations are threatened due to various environmental changes.  The population in the Moray Firth in Scotland is estimated to consist of around 130 animals and is declining by around 6% per year due to the impact of harassment and traumatic death, water pollution and reduction in food availability.

Read the complete story at BBC UK.

Copyright ©  2009 by Marine Science Today, a publication of OceanLines LLC

About the Author

About the Author: Celia is Director of Business Operations for OceanLines LLC and is a frequent contributor to both OceanLines and Marine Science Today. She is a certified diver and her favorite topic is marine biology, especially stories about whales. .

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