Archive for September, 2009

Latest In Series Of Investigations Of Au’au Channel Completed

Written by on September 29, 2009 in Marine Life
Latest In Series Of Investigations Of Au’au Channel Completed

NOAA scientists and colleagues from the State of Hawaii and the University of Hawaii Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (JIMAR) have concluded a survey of a large mesophotic reef complex to better understand the biodiversity, ecology, and function of deep reef ecosystems during a seven-day research cruise in late July in the Au’au Channel between the Hawaiian Islands of Maui and Lanai.

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Largest Oil Platform Spill in Australia Threatening Marine Life

Written by on September 25, 2009 in Marine Life, Policy & Ocean Law
Largest Oil Platform Spill in Australia Threatening Marine Life

The West Atlas drill rig began spewing 400 barrels of oil a day into the Timor Sea on August 21st and has occured right in the middle of a marine ‘superhighway’ for whales, turtles and seabirds and is close to unspoilt reefs and coral atolls.

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New Climate Phenomenon May Decrease El Niño’s Benefits

Written by on September 24, 2009 in Physical Oceanography
New Climate Phenomenon May Decrease El Niño’s Benefits

El Niño, the periodic eastern Pacific phenomenon credited with shielding the United States and Caribbean from severe hurricane seasons among other benefits may be overshadowed by its brother in the central Pacific due to global warming, according to an article in the September 24 issue of the journal Nature.

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200 Dead Walruses in Alaska: Global Warming Blamed

Written by on September 23, 2009 in Marine Life, Policy & Ocean Law
200 Dead Walruses in Alaska: Global Warming Blamed

The Arctic sea ice has reached the third-lowest level ever recorded, and up to 200 walruses, which appear to be mostly new calves and yearlings, have been reported dead near Icy Cape on the north coast of Alaska – further evidence of global warming’s brutal transformation of the Arctic.

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Field Reports: Bilal Khan from Temple University Study on Exxon Valdez Oil Pollution (4)

Written by on September 21, 2009 in Other News, Physical Oceanography
Field Reports: Bilal Khan from Temple University Study on Exxon Valdez Oil Pollution (4)

Field Reports about the latest study on the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill are the unvarnished, unedited journal entries of marine researchers in the field. They are intended to give readers a unique, inside look at the day-to-day nature of field work, an essential part of all marine science.

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Australian Shark Control Programs Indiscriminately Catch Marine Life

Written by on September 21, 2009 in Marine Life, Policy & Ocean Law
Australian Shark Control Programs Indiscriminately Catch Marine Life

The Australian Marine Conservation Society (AMCS) today condemned Queensland and New South Wales’ Shark Control Programs for their indiscriminate catch of marine wildlife, including rare and threatened species.

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New Robot To Determine The Impact Of Climate Change On Deep-Sea Ecosystems

Written by on September 17, 2009 in Marine Life, Technology
New Robot To Determine The Impact Of Climate Change On Deep-Sea Ecosystems

A new MBARI robot spent most of July traveling across the muddy ocean bottom, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) off the California coast. The Benthic Rover has been providing scientists with an entirely new view of life on the deep seafloor and is meant to give scientists a way to document the effects of climate change on the deep sea.

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Saving Marine Life: Coral Reefs Cleanup in Northwest Hawaii

Written by on September 16, 2009 in Marine Life, Other News, Policy & Ocean Law
Saving Marine Life: Coral Reefs Cleanup in Northwest Hawaii

The Oscar Elton Sette, one of NOAA’s research vessels is currently at the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument on its first of two planned expeditions this year outlined to remove deserted fishing gear to save marine life, especially in coral reef ecosystems of the North West Hawaiian Islands (NWHI).

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Combined Swedish-U.S. Expertise to Study the Amundsen Sea

Written by on September 15, 2009 in Marine Life, Other News, Technology
Combined Swedish-U.S. Expertise to Study the Amundsen Sea

A team of international scientists will work together on a new study of the open water and ice-covered regions of the Amundsen Sea to understand the physical, chemical, and biological interactions that make this region the most biologically productive of any waters adjacent to the Antarctic continent and how the system might change in the face of future increases in regional temperature and in the rate of Antarctic glacier melting.

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Hippocampus: Some Help for Imperiled Seahorses

Written by on September 14, 2009 in Marine Life, Other News
Hippocampus: Some Help for Imperiled Seahorses

Seahorse Ways Co. runs a culturing farm of seahorses in Minami-Kyshu, Japan hoping to help reverse the decline of the species.

The oldest fossils date back 13 million years to the Middle Miocene (found in the Tunjice Hills in Slovenia) and are of two pipefish-like species.

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